Plant Book

Arugula

ORIGIN // Also called roquette, salad rocket, garden rocket, or rugula. Native to the Mediterranean, arugula has been cultivated for centuries and is even mentioned in the bible.

QUALITIES // As with most dark leafy greens, arugula is high in a variety of nutrients. High in vitamin C, A, K. High in calcium, potassium and folate. Good source of iron.

USE // Arugula has a nutty flavor, is very versatile and can be used fresh or cooked. It is great as a base in a mixed salad, in sandwiches, as topping on pizzas or omelets. Add it fresh on top of the dish when it is ready to serve.

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

4 – 21 days

Matures In

30 - 40 days

Taste it For

4 - 5 weeks

The leaves can be clipped individually or the whole plant can be harvested. The leaves taste best when the plant is young and can be harvested once they are 2-3 inches long.

When the plant begins flowering, arugula leaves become bitter… That’s when you know the plant is done and it’s time to replace it.

For ongoing harvests, cut off the outer leaves at a point close to the base once the leaves are large enough.  You can also let the leaves grow and harvest them at full size when they’re 4 to 6 inches long. Larger leaves have a stronger flavor.

Recipe // Green Gazpacho

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds of seedless or hothouse cucumbers (about 2 large), chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, smashed
  • 2 cups chopped arugula
  • 2 cups chopped mixed tender herbs (such as basil, parsley, cilantro, and/or mint)
  • 3 tablespoons of red wine vinegar
  • Kosher salt
  • ¾ cup olive oil

instructions

Add cucumbers, garlic, and half cup of water in a blender and mix until smooth. Put in arugula, herbs, vinegar, and a large pinch of salt and purée, stopping to scrape down the sides of the blender as needed, until very smooth. With the blender on, slowly stream in oil; blend until emulsified. (The mixture will turn pale green and look creamy, almost like a salad dressing; add more oil and/or water if needed.) Taste gazpacho and season with more salt and vinegar as desired—you want it to be borderline too salty and acidic at room temperature. Transfer gazpacho to an airtight container; cover and chill until very cold, 4–12 hours.

Taste gazpacho and adjust with a little more salt and/or vinegar as needed just before pouring into chilled glasses.

Basil

ORIGIN // It is believed Basil was first domesticated in India and introduced in Occident by Alexandre the Great in 300BC. It was immediately adopted by Greeks and later on Romans as a key part of the so-called Mediterranean diet. The term “basil”, Basilikos in Greek, means royal plant or little king.

QUALITIES // Basil has been used for centuries as an aromatic herb for its outstanding taste but it also brings goodness to your health: Large quantities of vitamin K that supports healthy bones and blood. Antioxidants that protect your cells against the daily attacks of free radicals coming from our environment. Iron for healthy red cells and brain neutron-transmitters. Anti-bacterial: it has been used for centuries as part of balms to heal wounds.

USE // Basil is an outstanding way to give character to your pasta, pizzas or salads. Just use scissors to cut slices of it on top of your plate, directly from the yPod, and feel transported to Italy! It is also delicious in pesto: mix basil leaves, pine nuts, parmigiano cheese and olive oil. And pour on your pasta or pizza. If you have plenty of basil and you want to harvest it from your Gardyn, put as many leaves as possible in a jar, cover with olive oil and shake gently to remove air bubbles. This way your basil can stay in your fridge for months and be used when you want as pesto or directly as is in pasta.

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

5 – 21 days

Matures In

68 days

Taste it For

8 - 12 weeks

When harvesting basil, look for the two largest leaves on a stem, just below those you should see another set of leaves or little knobs (nodes) that are growing in between the stem smaller set of leaves. Cut the stem 1/4-1/2″ above the nodes. Repeat this with all the larger leaves on your plants. See Figure 1, Harvesting Basil.
Harvesting frequently will help prolong the life of the plant. The best taste is just before the plant flowers, and to delay flowering, pinch or clip off new flower buds. See Figure 2, flower buds.
Whenever you want a fresh garnish, feel free to pick off small amount of leaves from your grown plant.
Flowers can also be used and sprinkled over salads!

Recipe // Spaghetti with cherry tomatoes and walnut pesto

Ingredients

  • ⅔ cup walnuts
  • 2 pints of cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 2 tablespoons plus ⅓ cup olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • Kosher salt
  • 6 oil-packed anchovies, coarsely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
  • ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • ½ ounces Parmesan, finely grated (about ½ cup), plus more for serving
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 12 ounces spaghetti
  • ½ cup (packed) basil leaves

instructions

Preheat oven to 350°. Toast walnuts on a rimmed baking sheet, tossing once, until slightly darkened, 8–10 minutes. Let cool.
Heat broiler. Toss tomatoes with 2 Tbsp. oil on a rimmed baking sheet; season with salt. Broil, tossing once, until tomatoes are blistered and have released some of their liquid, 5–7 minutes. Let cool.
Pulse anchovies, garlic, lemon zest, red pepper flakes, and ½ oz. Parmesan in a food processor until finely ground. Add walnuts and half of tomatoes, then, with motor running, stream in ⅓ cup oil; process just until combined. Season with salt. Transfer pesto to a large bowl and stir in black pepper.
Cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until al dente. Drain, reserving ½ cup pasta cooking liquid.
Transfer pasta to bowl with pesto and add a splash of pasta cooking liquid. Toss, adding more cooking liquid as needed, until sauce coats pasta. Add basil and remaining tomatoes.
Divide among bowls; top with more Parmesan and black pepper and drizzle with oil.
Do Ahead: Pesto can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and chill.

Beets leaves

ORIGIN // Native to Europe, Asia and the Mediterranean region. The leaves are full of vitamins, and can be eaten at any stage. Eating the leaves was particularly popular among the ancient Greeks, Romans, and Jews. In the mid-18th century, the King of Prussia set out to discover which beet would prove to be the sweetest of them all. After evaluating 23 varieties, he selected the Silesian beet, which would serve as the grandfather of modern sugar beet.

QUALITIES // Beets are amazingly healthy eating and are excellent sources of: antioxidants, minerals and Vitamin A,C and K. Contain betaine, a compound essential for cardiovascular health. They are also sources of iron and riboflavin.

USE // These tasty and nutritious greens make a great substitute for any green such as spinach and bok choy. They can be steamed, sautéed, braised, added to soup, and eaten raw!

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

7 – 21 days

Matures In

28 - 40 days

Taste it For

4 - 5 weeks

For salad mix, cut as baby leaves picking off the larger outer leaves within approximately 28 days after seeding.
Cut individual mature stalks using the large outer ones first, leaving the small leaves in the middle to regrow.
Older leaves are often stripped off the plants and discarded to allow the young leaves to continue to grow.

Recipe // Sautéed Beet Greens with Garlic and Olive Oil

Ingredients

  • 1 pound beet greens (2 large or 3 small bunches)
  • Salt
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, to taste
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • ¼ teaspoon dried red pepper flakes (optional)
  • Freshly ground pepper

instructions

Bring a large pot of water to a boil while you stem the greens and wash the leaves in 2 rinses of water. When the water comes to a boil, add 1 tablespoon of salt and the greens. Blanch for 2 minutes, until tender. Transfer immediately to a bowl of ice water, then drain and squeeze the water out from its leaves. Chop coarsely.
Heat the oil over medium heat in a large, heavy nonstick skillet. Add the garlic and hot red pepper flakes (if using) and cook, stirring, until the garlic is fragrant and translucent, 30 to 60 seconds. Stir in the greens. Stir for a couple of minutes, until the greens are nicely seasoned with garlic and oil. Season with salt and pepper, remove from the heat, and serve.

Breen

ORIGIN // Lettuce is assumed to have originated in the middle east, with the earlier depictions being found from ancient Egypt around 2700 BC. Ancient Egyptians bred these plants to be less bitter. The oil from the wild plants were used for a variety of application including mummification. The Egyptians passed this knowledge onto Greeks who then passed it to the Romans. Romans are responsible for the expansion of the crop in Europe. Breen leaves have olive-green undertones and nicely contrasting veins. They are also firm and crisp with excellent flavor.

QUALITIES // This variety is highly nutritious due to protein chlorophyll present in its beautiful dark-green leaves. As a romaine lettuce variety, it’s a good source of: Vitamin A, C and K. Rich source of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and potassium and more.

USE // Salads are not complete if they don’t have these tasty leafy greens. It can also be braised or made into soup!

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

7 – 21 days

Matures In

45 days

Taste it For

3 - 5 weeks

Pick individual leaves or wait and harvest full heads.
For ongoing harvest, you can begin harvesting once the leaves reach about 4 inches tall. Harvest the outer leaves of the head and let the inner leaves continue to grow and mature. Just snip either single outer leaves or grab a bunch of them and cut them with scissors one inch above the base of the plant. Be careful; if you cut into or below the base, the plant may die, so leave the small leaves in the middle to regrow easily.
Do not cut more than a third of the plant in you want it to keep growing.

Recipe // Breen creamy soup

Ingredients

  • 1 cup chopped onions, scallions, and/or shallots
  • 1 garlic clove, chopped
  • 3 tablespoons
  • unsalted butter
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 3/4 cup diced (1/3 inch) peeled potato
  • 8 cups coarsely chopped breen lettuce leaves including ribs (3/4 lb)
  • 3 cups water

instructions

Cook onion mixture and garlic in 2 tablespoons butter in a 4- to 5-quart heavy pot over moderately low heat, stirring, until softened, 3 to 5 minutes. Add coriander, salt, and pepper and cook, stirring, 1 minute. Stir in potato, breen lettuce, and water and bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer, covered, until potato is very tender, about 10 minutes.
Purée soup in batches in a blender (use caution when blending hot liquids) and transfer to a 2- to 3-quart saucepan. Bring soup to a simmer, then whisk in remaining tablespoon butter and salt and pepper to taste.

Butterhead

ORIGIN // Lettuce is assumed to have originated in the middle east, with the earlier depictions being found from ancient Egypt around 2700 BC. Ancient Egyptians bred these plants to be less bitter. The oil from the wild plants were used for a variety of application including mummification. The Egyptians passed this knowledge onto Greeks who then passed it to the Romans. Romans are responsible for the expansion of the crop in Europe. This butterhead has good soft wrapping leaves with tons of flavor.

QUALITIES // Lettuces are particularly high in vitamin A and in Potassium, which supports blood pressure, cardiovascular health, bone strength, and muscle strength.

USE // Butterhead lettuce is especially great for use as a base for green salads and make great additions to sandwiches and wraps.

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

7 – 21 days

Matures In

45 days

Taste it For

3 - 5 weeks

Pick individual leaves or wait and harvest full heads.
For ongoing harvest, you can begin harvesting once the leaves reach about 4 inches tall. Harvest the outer leaves of the head and let the inner leaves continue to grow and mature. Just snip either single outer leaves or grab a bunch of them and cut them with scissors one inch above the base of the plant. Be careful; if you cut into or below the base, the plant may die, so leave the small leaves in the middle to regrow easily.
Do not cut more than a third of the plant in you want it to keep growing.

Recipe // Butterhead lettuce and spring vegetable salad

Ingredients

  • 5 teaspoons white balsamic vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • Coarse salt and ground pepper
  • 2 heads butterhead lettuce, washed and dried
  • 6 radishes, trimmed and thinly sliced
  • 1 large carrot, peeled and cut into thin strips
  • 2 ounces alfalfa sprouts

instructions

In a large bowl, whisk together vinegar and oil; season with salt and pepper.
Tear lettuce into bite-size pieces and add to bowl along with radishes and carrots. Toss; season with salt and pepper.
Divide salad equally among four plates and top each with sprouts. Serve immediately.

Celery

ORIGIN // Celery leaves and flowers were part of the ornamental garlands in the tomb of pharaoh Tutankhamen. Beyond culinary uses, Celery seeds also been used since antiquity as medicinal remedies for pain.

QUALITIES // Celery is highest in potassium but also contains significant quantities of sodium and calcium. Photochemically rich in antioxidants and the flavonoid Butylphthalide,  celery contains compounds that have shown to help hypertension and exhibit neuroprotective qualities. The natural oils from celery leaves can in rare cases cause a skin rash. It is best to wear long sleeves around this plant, or wash exposed hands and arms after handling.

USE // Celery is primarily cultivated for its stalks, which serve as a staple ingredient across cultures. The French culinary flavor base mirepoix leans on celery as a pillar alongside diced onion and carrot, that has served as a foundation for western soups, stocks, stews, and sauces.

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

14 – 30 days

Matures In

60-196 days*

Taste it For

Single use per stalk

Celery prefers cooler temperatures. For optimal germination and growth, keep temperatures between 70-75F. Celery can handle full sun to partial shade, so place your plant near the center of your Gardyn and avoid the top or bottom corners. Harvest stalks when long enough to eat by cutting at the base- stalks can be harvested young after about 60 days after sowing, through about 7 months after sowing*. Leaves are edible too, but more commonly they are removed and the stalk used for dishes. Harvests can be refrigerated for up to two weeks, or frozen fresh for up to two months.

Cherry Tomatoes

ORIGIN // Tomatoes are native to the Americas. Brought back to Europe with explorers, it moved around the continent and was accepted widely by the Mediterranean. Dwarf tomatoes were developed through an intercontinental project by heirloom tomato growers and bred determinant crops to be smaller. Some cultivars have also been cultivated specifically for production in space.

QUALITIES // Tomatoes are low in calories and high in nutritive values. High in the antioxidant lycopene and beta carotene. Good source of insoluble fiber. High in vitamin C, K and B9 (folate).

USE // Dwarf tomatoes grow cherry tomatoes. These can be eaten as snacks, in salads, stir fry, with pasta or pizza. It’s the perfect addition to the any food!

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

7 – 28 days

Matures In

60 days

Taste it For

8 - 16 weeks

Dwarf tomatoes are determinant varieties, meaning they will stop vegetative growth at a certain size. These require very little attention. The most important care is: remove small stems at the nodes, flower pollination and, cut the stem as needed to stop extension of the plant and keep it within the range of your Gardyn.
Move the plant as need be to keep it in the light.
The little yellow flowers produced by your plant will wilt and begin fruiting thanks to pollination. Tomatoes are naturally ”self-pollinate”, usually through wind movement or little bees. However, to ensure pollination, you can hand-pollinate or use small brush to do it. Gently shake the tomato plant by hand replicating the effects of wind, knocking the pollen down into the pistil or – gently, gently – disturb the inside of the blossom with your finger or a small brush.
Tomatoes should be harvested when they are even color (no longer green on one side), the tomato should be slightly soft. Cherry tomatoes should be picked before they look ‘perfectly ripe’ or they can crack if left on the plant. To harvest, twist the tomato until it snaps off, or use garden shears or a knife.

Recipe // Pizza with charred cherry tomatoes and pesto

Ingredients

  • 3/4 pound cherry tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup panko (Japanese bread crumbs)
  • 2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 1 shallot, thinly sliced
  • 5 basil leaves, torn
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • Pizza Dough
  • 3/4 cup coarsely grated aged Gouda (3 ounces)
  • 6 tablespoons freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
  • Basil Pesto

instructions

Step 1    
Preheat the broiler. In a medium baking dish, toss the cherry tomatoes with the panko, garlic, shallot, basil and olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Broil 6 inches from the heat for about 5 minutes, or until the tomatoes pop and brown lightly.
Step 2    
Preheat the oven to 500°. Set a pizza stone on the bottom of the oven and heat for at least 30 minutes.
Step 3    
On a lightly floured work surface, roll out each ball of Pizza Dough to a 7-inch round. Transfer two rounds to a lightly floured pizza peel. Spoon one-sixth of the cherry tomato topping on each round. Slide the pizzas onto the heated stone and bake for about 5 minutes, or until sizzling and just set. Remove from the oven and sprinkle each with 2 tablespoons of the aged Gouda and 1 tablespoon of the Parmigiano. Return the pizzas to the oven and bake for about 5 minutes longer, until the cheeses are melted and the crust is lightly browned. Drizzle with a little Basil Pesto and serve. Repeat with the remaining dough, tomato topping, cheeses and pesto.

Tip: the cherry tomato topping can be refrigerated overnight; let return to room temperature before using.

Chives

ORIGIN // This member of the onion family is native to Asia and Europe. The botanical name comes from a Greek word meaning ‘reed-like leek’

QUALITIES // Positively benefits blood circulation and digestive system. Good source of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Contain high levels of vitamin C.

USE // Chives pair well with seafood. Great garnish for cream soups, eggs, potato or macaroni salad. If the plant goes to flower these can be used on salads.

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

7 – 21 days

Matures In

75 - 85 days

Taste it For

8 - 12 weeks

Cut the scapes down to one to two inches of the base once chives are at least 4 inches tall. If the plant flowers harvest to prevent it from going to seed. The flowers are edible.
Store wrapped loosely in paper towel in the veggie drawer of the refrigerator.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 small garlic clove, finely chopped
  • Kosher salt
  • 2 teaspoons white wine vinegar or fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh chives
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 8 cups salad greens and fresh herb leaves and tender stems

instructions

Combine garlic and a pinch of salt in a large salad bowl. Mash to a paste with a fork. Mix in vinegar, then oil and chives; season with salt and pepper. Add greens and herbs and toss to coat.

Recipe // Creamy chive potatoes

Ingredients

  • 4 large Yukon Gold potatoes (about 1 1/2 pounds), peeled, cut into 1/2″ cubes
  • 1 1/2 cups half-and-half
  • 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter
  • Kosher salt
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh chives

instructions

Combine potatoes, half-and-half, and butter in a large saucepan; season with salt. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer very gently, stirring occasionally, until potatoes are tender (the tip of a paring knife meets no resistance) and sauce is thick, 25-35 minutes.
Season with salt; stir in most of the chives. Top with remaining chives before serving.

Cilantro

ORIGIN // Cilantro is another herb referred to in early texts including the Bible and Arabian Nights. Believed to have originated in the Mediterranean, it expanded throughout Asia and into Europe. It was one of the earliest herbs to be brought to the new world.

QUALITIES // Cilantro is from the same family as celery and carrots, cilantro has high carotenoid (antioxidant) levels, which protect cell from free radicals. It has high levels of vitamin A, which is good for the immune system, good vision and the growth of children. It also helps reduce inflammation.

USE // Cilantro can be used to add flavor to almost any dish. It is especially prevalent in South American and Asian cuisine. Try adding cilantro to your salad, stir fry or guacamole. It makes a huge difference and will enhance your dishes dramatically! The seeds of cilantro are called coriander and can be grounded on dishes or stews, and bring a delicate taste close to lemon.

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

5 – 21 days

Matures In

50 - 55 days

Taste it For

4 - 8 weeks

Once the plant reaches 6 inches, you can begin trimming larger outer leaves. Ensure you harvest only up to a third of the height of the plant at a time, to ensure it continues growing.
Prune your cilantro often to boost new growth.

Recipe // Black rice salad with cilantro pesto

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Brazil nuts
  • 1 small kabocha squash, peeled, seeded, cut into ½-inch pieces
  • 1½ cups olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons unseasoned rice vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons freshly grated lime zest
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
  • Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
  • 1 garlic clove, chopped
  • 1½ cups cilantro leaves with tender stems, divided
  • 6 radishes, very thinly sliced
  • 3 scallions, thinly sliced
  • 1 shallot, very thinly sliced
  • 3 cups cooked black rice (from about 1½ uncooked)

instructions

Preheat oven to 350°. Toast Brazil nuts on a rimmed baking sheet, tossing once, until golden brown, 10–12 minutes. Let cool.
Toss squash and oil in an 8×8″ baking dish; roast until squash is fork-tender, 30–40 minutes. Let cool, then strain oil into a small bowl; set squash aside. Whisk vinegar, lime juice, and 3 Tbsp. squash oil in another small bowl. Season vinaigrette with salt and pepper.
Purée Brazil nuts, garlic, lime zest, 1 cup cilantro, and remaining squash oil in a food processor until smooth. Season pesto with salt and pepper.
Toss radishes, scallions, shallot, black rice, vinaigrette, reserved squash, and remaining ½ cup cilantro in a large bowl; season with salt and pepper. Drizzle some pesto over salad. (Save any extra pesto and stir into yogurt or labneh or serve with cheese and crackers.)
Do Ahead: Kabocha squash can be cooked 1 day ahead. Keep in oil; cover and chill.

Dill

ORIGIN // Native to eastern Mediterranean and western Asia, it has been dated as early as 3000 BC in Egyptian texts. The word comes from the Norse word dylia meaning to soothe or lull.

QUALITIES // High in vitamin A, which is good for the immune system, good vision and the growth of children. Contains many other micronutrients that help in the maintenance of your cells.

USE // Dill has a very delicate flavor and can be a fragile plant: use your dill as soon as possible upon harvest. It goes especially well with zucchini, summer squash and fish such as herring and salmon. It can also be used when pickling for dill flavor.

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

7 – 21 days

Matures In

40 - 50 days

Taste it For

4 - 8 weeks

From seed it takes about 8 weeks for the plant to reach maturity, from then on prune the top third of the plant every 2 months. Remove flowers by pinching before they go to seed, this will keep the plant from dying off which happens after the seeds drop.
For small amount of dill, use your fingers to remove a few branches from the top of the plant. Be careful not to pull it from the pod.
For large amounts of dill, the whole stem can be harvested. Up to a third of the plant can be harvested for smaller amounts if you wish to keep the plant alive.
Trim leaves from the top to boost bushier growth rather than upward growth.

Recipe // Lemon chicken in dill cream sauce

Ingredients

  • 4 boneless skinless chicken breasts OR 4-
  • 6 chicken thighs
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1 tablespoon oil
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon each dried oregano, dried basil, garlic powder
  • Creamy Dill Sauce
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic
  • 1/2 cup low sodium chicken broth
  • 2/3 cup heavy cream OR half & half plus 1 tablespoon corn starch
  • juice of 1/2 lemon about 2 tablespoons
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh dill
  • cracked black pepper, to taste

instructions

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Season chicken with salt and pepper, to taste along with garlic powder, oregano, and basil. Combine butter and oil in a large oven-safe skillet (see note), once butter is melted add honey and stir to combine. 
Add chicken to pan, brown chicken 2-3 minutes on each side. Transfer chicken to a plate (it won’t be cooked through at this point). Add garlic and saute for 1 minute until fragrant. Add chicken broth, heavy cream, and lemon juice and stir over medium heat for 2-3 minutes. 
Return chicken to pan and transfer to preheated oven. Bake for 15 minutes or until chicken is cooked through. Spoon pan sauce over the chicken and sprinkle dill over the chicken and sauce, add cracked black pepper to taste and serve. 

Notes
If you don’t have an oven-safe skillet, use a regular pan for steps one and two, then transfer to a baking dish before proceeding with step three.

Green Mustard

ORIGIN // With a mild, sweet and earthy flavor, this mizuna green mustard is a relatively unknow, but marvelous green. It has been cultivated in Japan since ancient times, but most likely originated in China.

QUALITIES // Considered by some to be a ‘superfood’ mustard greens are nutrient packed. High in fiber. High nutrition to calorie ratio. High in phytonutrients. Extremely high in vitamin K. High in vitamin A and C. Good source of manganese, calcium and iron.

USE // Mustard greens have a strong flavor and are often mixed with other greens to tone down the flavor when eaten fresh. They can also be steamed or juice. Traditionally mustard greens are cooked with pork. Adding acid, such as lemon, and salt balances the flavor.

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

5 – 21 days

Matures In

21 - 40 days

Taste it For

4 - 8 weeks

Mustard needs little care and will do well untended as long as it receives necessary water supply.
Harvest when the leaves are young to ensure the freshest flavor and prevent the leaves from getting tough.
Cut the whole plant about an inch above the base or snip off outer leaves from the plant, and then leave it to continue growing.
Discard any yellow leaves that you find on the plant.

Recipe // Mizuna salad with peanuts

Ingredients

  • 10 cups mizuna, cut into large bite-sized pieces, washed and spun dry
  • ½ cup chopped chives
  • ¼ cup salted peanuts
  • ¼ cup unrefined peanut oil, such as Spectrum
  • 3 tablespoons white vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon Bragg Liquid Aminos, soy sauce or Tamari
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • Freshly ground
  • pepper, to taste
  • Pinch salt
  • Edible flowers for garnish

instructions

Combine mizuna, chives and peanuts in a large salad bowl. Combine peanut oil, vinegar, liquid aminos, soy sauce or tamari, sugar, pepper and salt in a jar; cover and shake to combine. Pour over the greens and toss to coat. Serve garnished with edible flowers.

Jalapenos

ORIGIN // This type of chile peppers originated in Mexico. After explorers met the new world, the crop spread around the world. The Spanish were the first to discover it in the New World, but the Portuguese did the most to bring it along their trade routes worldwide. Within North America, it is expected the fruit travelled with the slave trade, and Indigenous people had only been eating wild varieties in the southern USA prior to this.

QUALITIES // The compound which gives chilies their heat is called capsaicinoids, higher concentrations make the plant more pungent. The heat is ranked on the ‘Scoville scale’ which measures each pepper at Scoville heat units (SHU), bell peppers are rates as 0 SHU while the worlds hottest pepper the ‘Carolina Reaper’ is rated at 2,200,000 SHU. The ‘Jalapeno’ is rated up to 10,000 SHU.

USE // Chiles are used to add heat to any dish. The flesh and seeds can be used. Peppers are often dried and ground into chile pepper. It gives spice to a variety of dishes, including curry.

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

10 – 28 days

Matures In

60 - 80 days

Taste it For

8 - 20 weeks

Peppers grow in a ‘Y’ shape, ensure to only prune above this point. Begin pruning your peppers when they are 8-12 inches tall, pinch off the top of the plant to stunt the vertical growth of crops and increase bushiness. From above the main ‘Y’ node of the plant trim every third node, alternating inside and outside growth. Prune the first 3-4 flowers which appear on the plant, as these will take energy away from vegetative growth.
As the plants continue to grow, prune out any stems growing towards the center of the plant, as there is limited space available for growth. Keep in mind that flowers will become fruit eventually , which will need space to grow. Prune flowers at the top of the plant and along the plant at regular intervals.
Peppers are self pollinating, as they have male and female parts on one flower. Outdoors elements such as wind or insects help facilitate this pollination. In your Gardyn, you can use a paintbrush to pollinate. Ensure you do not use the same paintbrush between cultivars, as they will crossbreed. Tapping the pepper plants will also help in their pollination.
Helping with pollination is key. If white flowers fall to the ground, it means they have not been pollinated.
Peppers can be harvested when they are firm, they will be about 3 inches long. Leaving them on the plant longer they will continue to ripen and change color. Harvest by cutting off the plant.

Recipe // Jalapenos-cilantro yogurt sauce

Ingredients

  • 1 jalapeño, seeds removed, chopped
  • 1 cup plain whole-milk Greek yogurt
  • ½ cup cilantro leaves with tender stems
  • 2 tablespoons mint leaves
  • 1 tablespoon (or more) fresh lime juice
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cumin
  • Kosher salt

instructions

Purée jalapeño, yogurt, cilantro, mint, lime juice, cumin, and a generous pinch of salt in a blender until very smooth. Taste and season with salt and more lime juice, if desired.

Kale

ORIGIN // Kale has been a staple crop during hard times in many regions of the world, especially the north, as it is resilient to colder temperatures, grows relatively fast and is nutrient dense.

QUALITIES // Kale is known as a ‘superfood’ for its high nutrient density and is exceptionally high in the following: -Vitamin A, K, C -Magnesium, which supports healthy blood pressure, mood, sleep, and muscle strength among others -Antioxidants, which protect against the attack of free radicals -Beta-carotene, which is turned into vitamin A leading to the high vitamin A concentration.

USE // Kale can be used fresh or cooked. To use fresh, it is best to massage it to break down fibers and make it easier to eat. It can be tossed in olive oil with salt and baked on a sheet to make kale chips. Steaming it makes for great side dishes or additions to healthy bowls.

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

7 – 21 days

Matures In

53 - 65 days

Taste it For

4 - 8 weeks

Kale does not require any pruning. As leaves grow, they can be harvested as baby leaves which is great for fresh salad mixes. Cutting when the leaves are 2-3 inches tall will allow the plants to regrow. Once plant reaches maturity, harvest leaves as needed by cutting at the base.

Recipe // Spaghetti Aglio e Olio with Lots of Kale

Ingredients

  • Kosher salt
  • 3 large or 4 smaller bunches kale, any type (about 1½ pounds)
  • 5 garlic cloves
  • ¼ cup olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 12 ounces spaghetti, thick spaghetti, bucatini, or other long strand pasta
  • Parmesan and crushed red pepper flakes (for serving)
  • Flaky sea salt

instructions

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Meanwhile, strip kale leaves from ribs and stems, then tear leaves crosswise into 2″–3″ pieces. Cook kale in boiling water until bright green and slightly softened, about 2 minutes. Using tongs, transfer kale to a colander and rinse under cold water, tossing; squeeze out excess liquid from leaves. Keep water at a boil (you’ll use it for the pasta).
Whack garlic with the side of a chef’s knife to crush; peel off skins. Heat ¼ cup oil in a large heavy pot over medium. Cook garlic, stirring occasionally, until sizzling, about 3 minutes. Season very generously with black pepper and cook, smashing with a wooden spoon, until cloves break into rough pieces, soften, and look golden. Add kale to pot and cook, stirring often, until darkened in color and very tender, about 8 minutes (garlic will break into even smaller pieces). Season with kosher salt and pepper.
Meanwhile, cook pasta, stirring occasionally, until very al dente (2–3 minutes less than package directions).
Using tongs, add pasta to kale; splash in about 1 cup pasta cooking liquid. Cook, tossing and adding more pasta cooking liquid as needed, until sauce lightly coats pasta, about 2 minutes.
Serve pasta topped with Parmesan, red pepper flakes, sea salt, and more black pepper.

Matilda

ORIGIN // Lettuce is assumed to have originated in the middle east, with the earlier depictions being found from ancient Egypt around 2700 BC. Ancient Egyptians bred these plants to be less bitter. The oil from the wild plants were used for a variety of application including mummification. The Egyptians passed this knowledge onto Greeks who then passed it to the Romans. Romans are responsible for the expansion of the crop in Europe. With sweet and buttery-textured leaves, this lettuce has adds an incredibly flavor to your plates!

QUALITIES // Lettuces are particularly high in vitamin A and in Potassium, which supports blood pressure, cardiovascular health, bone strength, and muscle strength.

USE // Matilda lettuce make perfect cups for cooked ground chicken and shrimp and is great to break up and have in a green salad. Larger leaves from heads can be used in place of bread or tortillas as ‘lettuce wraps.’

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

7 – 21 days

Matures In

52 days

Taste it For

3 - 5 weeks

There is little care required for the growth of this lettuce. Once the head reaches a desired size, and before it bolts (begin to elongate) the whole head can be harvested and stored in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.
For ongoing harvest, you can begin harvesting once the leaves reach about 4 inches tall. Harvest the outer leaves of the head and let the inner leaves continue to grow and mature. Just snip either single outer leaves or grab a bunch of them and cut them with scissors one inch above the base of the plant. Be careful; if you cut into or below the base, the plant may die, so leave the small leaves in the middle to regrow easily.
Do not cut more than a third of the plant in you want it to keep growing.

Recipe // Pickled vegetable lettuce cups

Ingredients

  • ¼ cup apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt, plus more
  • ½ fennel bulb, thinly sliced
  • 1 small shallot, thinly sliced
  • 1 baby beet, trimmed, scrubbed, very thinly sliced
  • 2 radishes, trimmed, thinly sliced
  • ⅓ cup buttermilk
  • ⅓ cup whole-milk plain yogurt
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 head of matilda lettuce, leaves separated, cut in half crosswise
  • ½ cup cilantro leaves with tender stems
  • ¼ cup torn mint leaves

instructions

Combine apple cider vinegar, white wine vinegar, 1 Tbsp. kosher salt, and ½ cup water in a large bowl. Add fennel, shallot, beet, and radishes and let sit 10 minutes, then drain.
Whisk buttermilk, yogurt, and lemon juice in a small bowl; season dressing with salt and pepper.
Spoon some dressing onto lettuce leaves and top each with some drained pickled vegetables, cilantro, and mint. Serve with any remaining dressing alongside.
Do Ahead: Dressing can be made 2 days ahead. Cover and chill.

Mint

ORIGIN // Mint has been referred extensively in old texts and stories, implying its long history as a cultivated crop. It was referenced in the bible with suggestions it was considered very valuable. There are also stories from ancient mythology which speak of mint. Early on, mint was used for its pleasant scent and applied to various parts of the body and used to freshen breath and whiten teeth.

QUALITIES // Mint has antimicrobial properties making it great for use in oral health products as it contributes to fresh breath, simply chewing on a mint leaf can be incredibly refreshing. Mint is known to increase mental alertness and wakefulness.

USE // Mint is widely used infused in beverages, whether it be tea or mojitos, mint brings fresh flavor. Feel free to add it to salad as well to enhance it and bring a peppery and bright taste. Peppermint oil is widely used as a flavoring agent and can be used in a variety of homemade toiletry products.

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

10 – 21 days

Matures In

60 - 75 days

Taste it For

4 - 12 weeks

Mint starts slow and small: need a bit of patience. However, as soon as the roots have developed enough to catch the nutrients, it will grow and proliferate fast, so do not hesitate to trim to keep it as a bush (and push the plant to grow lateral stems).
Once it flowers the plant will lose some oils and flavor, so cut off buds before they have the chance to bloom. When the plant grows to about 1 foot, prune at the end of the stem to avoid buds and make it grow as a bush. Do not harvest lateral leaves but only terminal parts to avoid to grows too big.
For small amounts, you can harvest a few sprigs of mint at a time.  Large amounts should be harvested at time of pruning.

Recipe // Quinoa with corn, scallions, and mint

Ingredients

  • 4 ears corn, shucked
  • 1 tablespoon finely grated fresh lemon zest (from 2 lemons)
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 stick (1/4 cup) unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 tablespoon mild honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 cups quinoa (about 10 oz)
  • 4 scallions, chopped
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh mint

instructions

Put corn in a 5- to 6-quart wide pot, then add water to cover and bring to a boil, covered. Remove from heat and let stand, covered, 5 minutes. Transfer corn with tongs to a cutting board. When cool enough to handle, cut kernels off cobs with a large heavy knife.
Meanwhile, whisk together lemon zest and juice, butter, honey, salt, and pepper in a large bowl until combined.
Wash quinoa in 3 changes of cold water in a bowl, draining in a large sieve each time.
Cook quinoa in a 4- to 5-quart pot of boiling salted water, uncovered, until almost tender, about 10 minutes. Drain in sieve, then set sieve over same pot with 1 inch of simmering water (water should not touch bottom of sieve). Cover quinoa with a folded kitchen towel, then cover sieve with a lid (don’t worry if lid doesn’t fit tightly) and steam until quinoa is tender, fluffy, and dry, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat and let stand (still covered) 5 minutes.
Add quinoa to dressing and toss until dressing is absorbed, then stir in corn, scallions, mint, and salt and pepper to taste.

Oregano

ORIGIN // Oregano is found in Mexican and Mediterranean cuisine. Although similar, these varieties come from different families.

QUALITIES // Beyond cooking, oregano is used in many medical applications. The oil can be used as a topical antiseptic to soothe sore throats and help ward off common colds. The herb itself has many health benefits. It is rich in antioxidants and has anti-inflammatory properties

USE // Oregano adds flavor to sauces, pizza and is great for meat marinades. Add at the end of cooking to maximize flavor

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

7 – 21 days

Matures In

80 - 90 days

Taste it For

8 - 12 weeks

6 weeks after seeds have germinated cut down the oregano to 2 or 3 inches and harvest the pruned pieces, this will allow for the crop to grow bushier.
Stems can be snipped, or leaves can be harvested. Ensure to not harvest more than a third of the plant at a time if you wish to continue growth.

Recipe // Pistachio-oregano pesto

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup raw pistachios (about 4 ounces), coarsely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 anchovy fillet, chopped
  • 1/2 cup oregano leaves, coarsely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 3/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • Salt
  • Freshly ground pepper

instructions

Step 1    
Preheat the oven to 350°. Spread the pistachios in a pie plate and toast until lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Let cool completely.
Step 2    
In a food processor, combine the pistachios with the garlic, anchovy, oregano and lemon juice. Pulse to chop. Add the olive oil and pulse to form a coarse sauce. Season with salt and pepper.
Tip:
The pesto can be refrigerated for up to 4 days.

Red Mustard

ORIGIN // Red Mustard is thought to have originated in the Central Asian Himalayas before3 spreading to China, India, and the Caucasus. It is a beautiful leafy green with vibrant, dark red leaves.

QUALITIES // Mustard leaves are an excellent source of vitamins C and E, fiber, folate, calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and B6. The calcium in mustard leaves ranks as the highest in its bioavailability.

USE // Red mustard leaves have a spicy, peppery flavor. Mature leaves can be boiled, sautéed, steamed, or braised. Cook them for ten to twenty minutes. The longer they are cooked, the softer the favor becomes. Baby mustard greens can be eaten raw in salads or sandwiches.

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

5 – 21 days

Matures In

21 - 45 days

Taste it For

4 - 6 weeks

Cut individual leaves for ongoing harvest, or the whole plant at whatever stage of maturity you desire.
If you wish to gradually harvest it, do not cut more than a third of the plant so it can keep growing.
Younger leaves tend to be more tender and less flavored as mature leaves.

Recipe // Asian-inspired mustard greens

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon sesame seeds (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon Asian (toasted) sesame oil
  • 6 cups chopped mustard greens
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic, or to taste
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons Japanese rice wine (mirin) vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon sake (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon white sugar

instructions

Place the sesame seeds into a large skillet over medium heat, and cook and stir constantly until the seeds are toasted a golden brown and make a continuous crackling noise, 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer the seeds immediately to a bowl to stop the cooking process. Set seeds aside.
Place sesame oil in the hot skillet, and heat until it just begins to smoke (this should happen very fast). Place mustard greens into the hot oil, and pour in water. With a spatula, gently toss the greens until they are wilted and reduced in quantity, about 2 minutes. Mix in garlic, soy sauce, rice wine vinegar, sake, and sugar.
Bring the mixture to a boil, stir until sugar has dissolved, and cover the skillet. Reduce heat to a simmer, and cook until the greens are tender, 10 to 15 minutes. If a thicker sauce is desired, remove greens with a slotted spoon, and cook the liquid down to desired thickness; return greens to the skillet, toss in the pan juices, and sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds.

Note: this dish goes well with rice bowl, roasted chicken or any kind of pork!

Rouge d'hiver

ORIGIN // Rouge d’hiver (Red of Winter) is an old French romaine variety with medium-red tinted leaves and exceptional flavor. Listed in Vilmorin’s The Vegetable Garden (1885) as a hardy, productive plant is a favorite for many home gardeners.

QUALITIES // Lettuces are particularly high in vitamin A and in Potassium, which supports blood pressure, cardiovascular health, bone strength, and muscle strength.

USE // Great to break up and have in a green salad. Larger leaves from heads can be used in place of bread or tortillas as ‘lettuce wraps.’

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

7 – 21 days

Matures In

28 - 50 days

Taste it For

3 - 5 weeks

There is little care required for the growth of this lettuce. Once the head reaches a desired size, and before it bolts (begin to elongate) the whole head can be harvested and stored in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.
For ongoing harvest, you can begin harvesting once the leaves reach about 4 inches tall. Harvest the outer leaves of the head and let the inner leaves continue to grow and mature. Just snip either single outer leaves or grab a bunch of them and cut them with scissors one inch above the base of the plant. Be careful; if you cut into or below the base, the plant may die, so leave the small leaves in the middle to regrow easily.
Do not cut more than a third of the plant in you want it to keep growing.

Recipe // Caesar salad with rouge d’hiver

Ingredients

For the dressing: 

  • 1/2 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1 to 2 anchovy fillets
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 pasteurized large egg yolk
  • 1/2 cup canola oil
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons grated lemon zest
  • 1/2 teaspoon dijon mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon honey (preferably chestnut honey)
  • Dash of hot sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon chardonnay vinegar (or other white wine vinegar)
  • 1/2 cup freshly grated parmesan cheese

For the salad:

  • 4 to 5 heads baby red lettuce
  • 1/2 cup freshly grated parmesan cheese
  • French-bread croutons, for topping
  • Fresh lemon juice, for sprinkling

instructions

Make the dressing: Blend the lemon juice, anchovies, Worcestershire sauce, egg yolk, canola oil, garlic, lemon zest, mustard, honey, hot sauce and vinegar in a blender until well incorporated and fluffy. If the dressing is too thick, blend in a little cold water. Gently fold in the parmesan. (Store leftover dressing in the refrigerator, covered, for up to 1 week.) 
Make the salad: Slice the baby romaine lengthwise into spears, leaving some of the stem intact so the leaves don’t separate. Put the lettuce in a large bowl, drizzle with 1 to 2 tablespoons of the dressing and gently toss with your hands (do not over-toss). Transfer to a large platter or bowl. Sprinkle with the grated parmesan. Add some croutons, crumbling them slightly as you add them. Sprinkle fresh lemon juice over the entire salad right before serving. Bon appetit! 

Sage

ORIGIN // Sage is native to the Mediterranean. Ancient Rome considered sage to gave powerful healing properties and used it as a medicine more so than a food.

QUALITIES // Sage is used for its health and beauty benefits. It can be used externally on hair to improve texture. Steeped sage can be used as facial toner and used to treat fungal nail infection. There are many health benefits associated with using sage: High level of vitamin K, that supports healthy bones and blood. High in antioxidants, that fight damaging free radicals. -Has been shown to reduce blood sugar level

USE // Can used as a naturally preservative for meat. Sage is a great rub for meats. Good seasoning for roasted vegetables, especially root vegetables. Use as a garnish for soups or sauces. Can be infused in tea.

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

7 – 21 days

Matures In

80 - 90 days

Taste it For

4 - 12 weeks

Sage is a slow-grower but easy to maintain herb. It tends to grow long. Do not hesitate to trim to force it to grow more like a bush.
After crops reach maturity, cut top of stems so they are 4-6 inches tall. While the plant is young, prune lightly to allow the plant to develop fully.
Throughout the life of the plant remove any leaves which are discolored or dying.
Cut an entire stem if desired, or pinch a leaf at a time.
For small amounts harvest  leaves at the tips with scissors. Full stems can be harvested and hung to dry for at least two weeks and can then be stored in an airtight container.
 

Recipe // Grilled fontina, mushroom, and sage sandwiches

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons butter, 2 melted
  • 1/2 pound mushrooms, cut into thin slices
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon fresh-ground black pepper
  • 4 teaspoons chopped fresh sage, or 1 1/4 teaspoons dried sage
  • 8 slices from a large round loaf of country-style bread, or other bread
  • 1/2 pound fontina, grated (about 2 cups)

instructions

In a large nonstick frying pan, heat 1 tablespoon of the butter over moderate heat. Add the mushrooms, salt, pepper, and dried sage, if using, and cook, stirring frequently, until golden brown, about 5 minutes. Stir in the fresh sage, if using. Put the mushrooms in a bowl and wipe out the pan.
Using a pastry brush, coat one side of 4 slices of the bread with half of the melted butter. Put them, buttered-side down, on a work surface. Top the bread with the cheese and then the mushrooms. Cover with the remaining 4 slices of bread; brush the tops with the remaining melted butter.
Heat the frying pan over moderately low heat. Add the sandwiches and cook, turning once, until golden, about 2 minutes per side.

Sweet peppers

ORIGIN // Like their relative, the chili peppers, sweet peppers originated in Mexico with seeds of a wild variety dating back 5,000 BC. Like many other foods native to this region, sweet peppers were carries throughout the world by the Spanish and Portuguese explorers who traveled through this continent.

QUALITIES // Sweet Peppers are an excellent source of vitamin C. High doses of antioxidants. Source of dietary fiber, vitamins A, K and B6. Boost the immune system.

USE // Sweet peppers are irreplaceable in certain recipes, like fajitas or stir-frys. They are versatile and easy to work with, too. Can be added to salads to enhance the taste and bring freshness. Add sweet peppers to pastas, curries or soups to add a zing to your plates.

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

10 – 28 days

Matures In

75 - 83 days

Taste it For

8 - 20 weeks

Peppers grow in a ‘Y’ shape, ensure to only prune above this point. Begin pruning your peppers when they are 8-12 inches tall, pinch off the top of the plant to stunt the vertical growth of crops and increase bushiness. From above the main ‘Y’ node of the plant trim every third node, alternating inside and outside growth. Prune the first 3-4 flowers which appear on the plant, as these will take energy away from vegetative growth.
As the plants continue to grow, prune out any stems growing towards the center of the plant, as there is limited space available for growth. Keep in mind that flowers will become fruit eventually , which will need space to grow. Prune flowers at the top of the plant and along the plant at regular intervals.
Peppers are self pollinating, as they have male and female parts on one flower. Outdoors elements such as wind or insects help facilitate this pollination. In your Gardyn, you can use a paintbrush to pollinate. Ensure you do not use the same paintbrush between cultivars, as they will crossbreed. Tapping the pepper plants will also help in their pollination.
Helping with pollination is key. If white flowers fall to the ground, it means they have not been pollinated.
Peppers can be harvested when they are firm, they will be about 3 inches long. Leaving them on the plant longer they will continue to ripen and change color. Harvest by cutting off the plant.

Recipe // Grilled mini sweet peppers with goat cheese

Ingredients

  • 1 pound Mini Sweet Peppers
  • 1/2 Tablespoon Olive Oil
  • Kosher Salt And Freshly
  • Ground Black Pepper
  • 1 Log (4 Oz. Size) Goat Cheese
  • Minced Fresh Rosemary
  • Minced Fresh Thyme
  • Smoked Sea Salt Flakes

instructions

Heat grill to medium to medium-high heat. Make sure grates are scrubbed clean and then oiled. (To oil the grates, add some canola oil to a small bowl. Then fold a heavy paper towel a few times to make a smaller square. With a tongs, grasp the folded paper towel and dip it into the oil until the paper towel is drenched. Then run the paper towel over the grates, repeating until all grill grates are thoroughly oiled.)

Cut stems off peppers, then slice peppers in half lengthwise and remove inner ribs and seeds. Place halved peppers on large rimmed baking sheet and drizzle with olive oil, folding to coat evenly. Sprinkle with a bit of kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper. Fold and repeat.

Place peppers cut-side down on hot grill grates. Once the peppers are charred to your liking, flip to grill the other side of the peppers. Each side should only take a minute or two. When peppers are done, remove them to the rimmed baking pan, cut-side up – or to a platter for a nicer serving presentation. Using a small knife or spoon, remove a bit of goat cheese from the log and add it to the center of a grilled pepper half. Repeat until all goat cheese is used. 

Sprinkle peppers with fresh rosemary and thyme, plus a nice amount of smoked sea salt flakes. Some of the salt flakes can be rather large, so lightly crunch them between your finger tips as you sprinkle, if desired. I’ve found that our family likes to get plenty of pops of smoked salt in their bites, so I tend to sprinkle fairly generously. Serve warm.

Tatsoi

ORIGIN // Beautiful, glossy, spoon-shaped plant native to China and considered to be an ancient green because its long history of cultivation. It has been cultivated since 500 A.D.

QUALITIES // As with all leafy green vegetables, tatsoi mustard is a great addition to any diet. It is high in: - Calcium and folate, which is needed to make red and white cells in the bone marrow, and produce DNA and RNA. - Phytonutrients, which provide antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits. They enhance immunity and intercellular communication, and help repair DNA.
-Vitamins A and C.
-Fiber.

USE // Tatsoi can be used fresh or cooked, similar to spinach. It has a sweet and nutty flavor and pairs well with citrus and sweet flavors. The leaves do not do fair well if cooked for an extended amount of time, it is best to sauté them until they begin to wild or added to the soup near the end of the cooking process.

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

5 – 21 days

Matures In

21 - 45 days

Taste it For

4 - 5 weeks

Tatsoi can be harvested as early as three weeks from planting for baby greens, or wait for mature leaves.
The outer leaves can be harvested by cutting at least one inch above the base of the rosette to let the small inner leaves grow. Alternately, the whole plant can be harvested.
Tatsoi tends to grow long roots: check from time to time and trim roots to keep them in the pod.
It can be cooked but it is also very good in a salad: nutty, buttery taste.

Recipe // Tatsoi and hoisin salmon stir-fry

Ingredients

  • 400 grams salmon
  • 300 grams tenderstem broccoli
  • 300 grams tatsoi (fresh)
  • 1 pepper (medium-large)
  • 200 grams kale (fresh)
  • 2 teaspoons hoisin sauce
  • 1 pinch salt
  • pepper (to taste)
  • 2 teaspoons sesame oil
  • 1 red chili (Asian)
  • 1 clove garlic (crushed)
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon ginger (freshly grated)
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • 2 tablespoons teriyaki sauce
  • 1 tablespoon sesame seeds (mixed)
  • 5-6 pieces shiitake mushrooms (optional)

instructions

Mix the garlic with the ginger, 1/2 soy sauce, 1/2 of the hoisin sauce, 1/2 teriyaki sauce and the honey. Pour over the salmon pieces and leave aside for at least 20-30 min or even longer if possible.
In a frying pan just cook the marinated salmon on a low heat. Turn occasionally. Depending on the size of the fish, cook till nicely browned.
Simultaneously but separately, in a deeper frying pan add the sesame oil. Cook initially the mushrooms and the pepper for a 2-4 min. Then add the chopped greeneries ( broccoli and tatsoi) stirring occasionally. Add the remainder of the soy, teriyaki and hoisin sauces. Toss around and cook for around 5 minutes. Add the sliced red chili.
To finish off the cooking, add the salmon broken into bigger chunks and sprinkle some sesame seeds

Thyme

ORIGIN // Native to the Mediterranean, it was used by the ancient Greeks in baths and burnt as incense as they believed it gave one courage. In the middle ages, thyme was given to soldiers as it was associated to courage and bravery.

QUALITIES // Thymol is a compound produced in thyme which has antibacterial, antifungal and insecticidal properties. Thyme is packed with a variety of vitamins and minerals including vitamin A, B, C, E and K. Minerals in notable quantity include potassium, iron, calcium, manganese, magnesium and selenium.

USE // Thyme has an earthy flavor and is best used to season soups, steams, meat and vegetables. Pairs well with other Mediterranean herbs like oregano. Thyme can be steeped as a herbal tea by infusing with boiling water for 10 minutes.

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

7 – 21 days

Matures In

90 - 95 days

Taste it For

4 - 12 weeks

Once the crop reaches 8-10 inches, snip the top of the plant, but only the green stem, not any woody sections. Ensure at least 5 inches of the plant remains.
Harvest the plants just before they flower for the highest potency.
Trimming your thyme often will encourage more fresh growth and more rounded shape.

Recipe // Creamy lemon thyme chicken

Ingredients

  • 6 boneless skinless chicken thighs or 4 boneless skinless chicken breasts
  • 2 teaspoons Italian seasoning
  • 2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh thyme
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon lemon pepper
  • juice of 1 medium lemon (about 2 tablespoons)
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1/2 cup low sodium chicken broth
  • 1/2 cup sliced mushrooms
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic

instructions

Whisk together Italian seasoning, chopped thyme, garlic powder, and lemon pepper. Season chicken with half of the mixture. Cook chicken in a greased pan or skillet over medium heat 5-7 minutes on each side until lightly browned and cooked through. Transfer chicken to a plate and cover to keep warm.
Add garlic and mushrooms to pan and stir over medium heat 2-3 minutes until fragrant and mushrooms are tender. Stir in chicken broth, lemon juice, and remaining seasoning mixture. Stir in cream until mixture begins to boil, cook another 2-3 minutes, stirring constantly.
Return chicken to pan and toss in the sauce to coat. Garnish with lemon slices, fresh thyme, and cracked black pepper as desired. Serve hot.

Cardinale Lettuce

ORIGIN // Cardinale Lettuce is a red french variety that produces open rosettes until full maturity, then folds itself into a lovely red crisphead.  Cardinale color is alluring and intense and has the habit of a wide Romaine.

QUALITIES // This variety is highly nutritious due to protein chlorophyll present in its beautiful dark-green leaves. It’s a good source of: Vitamin A, C and K. Calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, potassium and more.

USE // Great to break up and have in a green salad. Larger leaves from heads can be used in place of bread or tortillas as ‘lettuce wraps.’ 



Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

7 – 21 days

Matures In

60 days

Taste it For

3 - 5 weeks

There is little care required for the growth of this lettuce. Once the head reaches a desired size, and before it bolts (begin to elongate) the whole head can be harvested and stored in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. 

For ongoing harvest, you can begin harvesting once the leaves reach about 4 inches tall. Harvest the outer leaves of the head and let the inner leaves continue to grow and mature. Just snip either single outer leaves or grab a bunch of them and cut them with scissors one inch above the base of the plant. Be careful; if you cut into or below the base, the plant may die, so leave the small leaves in the middle to regrow easily.

Do not cut more than a third of the plant if you want it to keep growing.

Recipe // Red Leaf and Mandarin Salad

INGREDIENTS

  • 8 cups torn red leaf lettuce
  • 1 can (15 ounces) mandarin oranges, drained
  • 1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese
  • 1/4 cup chopped sweet yellow pepper
  • 1/4 cup chopped sweet red pepper
  • 5 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 4-1/2 teaspoons cider vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped red onion
  • 1/3 cup sliced almonds, toasted

INSTRUCTIONS​

In a salad bowl, combine the lettuce, oranges, cheese and peppers. 

In a small bowl, whisk the oil, honey, vinegar, mustard and salt. Stir in onion. Pour over salad and toss to coat. Sprinkle with almonds. Serve immediately.

Swiss Chard

ORIGIN // Also known by the names Silverbeet, Perpetual Spinach, Spinach Beet, Crab Beet, Seakale Beet, and Mangold. This leafy vegetable is in the same species as beetroot (garden beet) but it lacks the swollen, edible storage root. The word Swiss was used to differentiate chard from French spinach varieties by 19th century seed catalog publishers. The first varieties of this popular leafy vegetable have been traced to Sicily.

QUALITIES // Similar to other leafy greens, it’s loaded with vitamins and minerals such as: Vitamin A, C and K. Phytonutrients and fiber. Phytonutrients are known to protect against cataracts and macular degeneration. It has high levels of the minerals iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, and calcium. 

USE // Considered a favorite leafy green because of its colors, and its versatility, Swiss Chard has a mild, sweet earthy taste with some bitterness. Both the leaf and the stalk can be cooked and enjoyed. This green loses its bitter flavor and takes on a more refined taste when it is cooked. Typically enjoyed fresh, it can also be frozen, canned, or dried as well.

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

7 – 21 days

Matures In

32 days baby leaf; 59 days bunching

Taste it For

4 - 5 weeks

Swiss Chard can be harvested while the leaves are young or after maturity when they are larger and have slightly tougher stems. Young leaves (smaller than 4 inches) can be eaten fresh in salads. Mature leaves may be chopped and sautéed. The “ribs” can be eaten like celery. 

At any point in the growing cycle, snip leaves 2 inches above crowns to rejuvenate plants. New, succulent leaves soon will be ready to harvest.




Recipe // Wilted Chard with Shallots and Vinegar

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 bunch Swiss chard, ribs and stems separated from leaves
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 large shallots, thinly sliced into rings
  • 2 garlic cloves, grated
  • Kosher salt
  • 2 teaspoons Sherry vinegar or red wine vinegar

INSTRUCTIONS

Cut Swiss chard stems into very small pieces. Tear leaves into 2″ pieces and rinse well (you’ll want some water still clinging to the leaves).

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high. Add chard stems, shallots, and garlic and season with salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until vegetables are starting to soften but haven’t taken on any color, about 2 minutes. Add chard leaves, season with salt, and cook, tossing occasionally, until leaves are tender and have released some liquid, about 3 minutes (stems will have a bit of crunch). Mix in vinegar; taste and season with more salt if needed.



Watercress

ORIGIN // Native of Europe and Asia,  Watercress is rich in vitamins and has a delicious, distinctive taste for salads and vegetarian dishes. Romans called it “nasturtium” which means “twisted nose”.

QUALITIES // Watercress is packed with lots of vital compounds and nutrients. Excellent source of Vitamin A, C, K. Good source of calcium and potassium. High Antioxidant Content. Rich in Carotenoids.

USE // Watercress can be used in a wide variety of dishes. But to get the most benefits from its active antioxidant compounds, it’s best eaten raw or lightly steamed. Use it on salads, stir it into your soup, add to a sandwich or use it to top any dish! 



Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

7 – 21 days

Matures In

60 days

Taste it For

4 weeks

Once the plants have grown roughly five to six inches use kitchen or gardening scissors to trim the top four inches of the plant as needed. You can also pick individual leaves as needed. 

Do not cut more than a third of the plant when trimming if you wish to continue growing.

Pruning the plants will encourage them to be thicker and lush.




Recipe // Mushroom, Parmesan, and Watercress Omelet

INGREDIENTS

  • 1/2 cup cremini mushrooms, sliced
  • 1/4 cup watercress
  • 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 2 tablespoons finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano, plus more for serving (optional)
  • Chopped chives and buttered toast for serving (optional)

INSTRUCTIONS

Cook 1/2 cup sliced cremini mushrooms in 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil in an 8-inch nonstick skillet over medium heat until caramelized, 6 to 8 minutes. Season with salt and pepper; transfer to a bowl. Stir 1/4 cup packed watercress into mushrooms until slightly wilted. Return skillet to heat.

Using a fork (for good control), beat eggs with 1 teaspoon water until yolks and whites are completely combined and no streaks remain. The water helps incorporate them and steams while the omelet cooks, which puffs it up. Season with 1/8 teaspoon kosher salt and a few cracks of pepper.

Heat butter over medium-high heat until foaming; swirl to coat. When foam subsides, pour eggs into center of skillet. Let stand 10 seconds. Stir eggs with a rubber spatula in a circular motion with one hand while shaking skillet with the other, about 15 seconds. Reduce heat to medium. Working your way around skillet, gather outer set eggs toward center, then tip skillet so runny eggs move to outside edges, about 1 minute. Lightly spread any remaining runny eggs evenly over top and cook until creamy but no longer wet.

Add mushroom-watercress mixture and 2 tablespoons finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano onto far side of omelet. Remove from heat. Tip pan away from you; gently slide spatula under near side of omelet and fold up and over cheese. Slide onto a warm plate. Top with more finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano or chopped chives and serve with buttered toast, if desired.

Mexican Tarragon

Origin // Also known as Winter Tarragon, this cousin of the marigold is native to Mexico and Central America. The toothed, thin leaves share the flavor of traditional tarragon with a pleasant anise scent, and the flowers are edible too. Winter Tarragon is said to have been used as a ritual incense by the Aztecs and as a key ingredient in a medicinal tea used by the Huichol.

Qualities // Can help calm nausea. Antifungal / antibacterial properties. Improves dreaming. Produces the terpenes cineol, estragole, ocimene, and phellandrene.

Use // Dried Mexican Tarragon leaves and flowers are edible and commonly used as a seasoning. It can be a direct substitute for French Tarragon. Flavor pairs especially well with lemon, pear, or black pepper. Can also be used as an herbal tea.

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

4 – 14 days

Matures In

75 - 85 days

Taste it For

8 - 20 weeks

Mexican Tarragon can grow indefinitely in your Gardyn, but it might be time to grow a new seed if your plant is looking stressed after a few harvests.
 
Wait until your plant is at least 8” long before harvesting.
 
Harvest by cutting the top 4-6” off the branches. It’s important to leave enough branch remaining for the plant to continue growing.
 
Optionally, wait until the branch blooms before harvesting to collect edible flowers and leaves.
 
Pluck or cut leaves and flowers off harvested branches to use fresh.
 
To dry for long-term storage, tie the fresh branches together and hang-dry until the branches snap instead of bend before stripping off the leaves and flowers.

 

Recipe // Mexican Tarragon Vinaigrette [Long Prep]

INGREDIENTS

• 1/2 Cup White Wine Vinegar
• 1/4 Cup Mexican Tarragon Leaves
• 1 Tbs Dijon Mustard
• 1 clove garlic, pressed or minced
• 1/4 tsp salt
• 1/4 tsp pepper
• 1/4 cup olive oil

INSTRUCTIONS​

Fill a 4oz Jar with 1/4 cup Mexican Tarragon leaves. Add 1/2 cup white wine vinegar to fill. You may not need to use all of the white wine vinegar.

Seal with a non-reactive lid and steep for 14 days.

Strain using a strainer, cheesecloth, or coffee filter. Set aside 1/4 cup and store the rest in a clean jar.

Combine the 1/4 cup steeped tarragon vinegar with the Dijon Mustard, minced garlic, salt, and pepper. Whisk well until evenly mixed.

Gradually add in the oil, whisking well to blend.

Store in refrigerator for up to one week. Whisk well at room temperature before serving.

Rosemary

ORIGIN // Rosemary is native to the Mediterranean region and Asia, and gets its name from Latin “ros marinus” or “dew of the sea”. Rosemary was considered sacred to ancient Egyptians,  Romans, and Greeks.  

QUALITIES // Produces small, fragrant leaves and flowers in beautiful shades of white, blue, and purple. Beyond its aesthetics, rosemary helps deter pests and acts as a natural sentinel in your Gardyn. Rosemary leaves have little nutritional value, but its fragrant oils and phytochemicals are strong in antioxidant properties, could potentially lower blood sugar, and have been known to improve brain health.

USE // Rosemary has a piney astringent flavor, and aroma similar to tea and charred wood. Best used as seasoning for savory foods or meats, or prepared as an herbal tea. Blend with oregano and thyme as the foundation for a simple herbal seasoning.

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

15 – 25 days

Matures In

42 days

Taste it For

1 - 50 weeks

Wait until branches are at least 8” long before harvesting.
 
Cut off last 1/4 section of branch, leaving behind 3/4 to continue growing.
 
Strip or pluck leaves from harvested branch for immediate use, or to store refrigerated for up to two weeks.
 
For long term storage (up to 1 year), hang harvested branches to dry for 10 days before stripping the leaves.

Recipe // Rosemary Lemon Pasta

INGREDIENTS

• 4-6 ounces spaghetti or linguini (reserve some pasta water)
• 1/4 cup panko bread crumbs
• 1 tablespoon chopped fresh Gardyn Rosemary
• 2 cups fresh Gardyn Kale or Swiss Chard
• 1 clove minced garlic
• 1-2 lemons (plus zest)
• 2 tablespoons olive oil
• Salt, to taste
• Toasted sliced almonds as topping, to taste (optional)
• Red pepper flakes, to taste (optional)

INSTRUCTIONS

Cook your pasta in salty boiling water until al dente.

While your pasta cooks, toast the panko, rosemary and a pinch of salt in a medium/large skillet. When the panko starts to brown a little bit, remove the mixture from the pan and set aside.

Wipe out the pan and add drizzle of olive oil, the collard greens, a few pinches of salt, the minced garlic and a good squeeze of lemon. Cook until the collard greens are mostly wilted (a few minutes).

Add the pasta, and toss with a small dab of butter, a squeeze of lemon, and some reserved pasta water if necessary to loosen it up. Finish with a drizzle of olive oil.

Remove from heat and toss with the rosemary-panko mixture, toasted almonds, a bit of lemon zest and a pinch of red pepper flakes. Taste, adjust seasonings.

Sweet Thai Basil

ORIGIN // A variety of Sweet Basil, Thai Basil is commonly found in Southeast Asia and boasts a slightly spicy anise flavor. Because of the intense flavor, it is sometimes called Anise Basil or Licorice Basil. Thai Basil is ubiquitous in Vietnamese and Thai cuisine and is often used in Pho, pad thai, and curry.

QUALITIES // Thai Basil contains the vitamins K, A, and C, the minerals magnesium, calcium, iron, and potassium, the terpenes beta-carotene and eugenol. Beta-carotene and eugenol have been known to have anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties.

USE // Fresh leaves can be added to traditional Vietnamese and Thai dishes for incredible flavor. Substitute for Genovese Basil to add a subtle licorice flavor to your traditional dishes. The flowers are edible too, and can serve as a beautiful garnish in coolers or mixed drinks.

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

5 – 10 days

Matures In

64 days

Taste it For

8 - 12 weeks

Begin light harvesting after plants have become established. Cut mature leaves as needed, or harvest the entire plant.
 
If harvesting the whole plant, leave 4-6″  behind to continue growth.
 
Flowers are edible too and can be included in the harvest
 
Do not store at a temperature less than 50°F
For long term storage (up to 1 year), hang harvested branches to dry for 10 days before stripping the leaves.

Recipe // Thai Basil Eggplant

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 large Italian eggplant , or 2 medium Japanese or Chinese eggplants
  • 1 green bell pepper , thinly sliced
  • 1 red bell pepper , thinly sliced
  • 1 yellow bell pepper , thinly sliced
  • 1 white onion , halved and thinly sliced
  • 14 oz firm tofu , block
  • 2 cloves garlic , minced
  • 4 tbsp cooking oil , such as coconut, grapeseed, or avocado
  • Gardyn Thai Basil leaves (to flavor)

For the sauce:

  • 4.5 tbsp hoisin sauce , see notes below for brand recommendations
  • 1/2 cup tamari , or soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 2 teasp chili sauce , such as Huy Fong Chili Sauce
  • 2 teasp corn starch

INSTRUCTIONS

To Prepare the Eggplant:
 
Cut off the top and bottom tips, and slice the eggplant lengthwise into 3/4-inch thick slivers.
 
In a large non-stick pan or stainless steel pan, heat 2 or 3 Tbsp of cooking oil on medium heat.
 
Add the eggplant pieces and toss to coat them in oil. Add a little amount of water, reduce heat to low-medium, cover, and stir regularly to cook.
 
The eggplant is done once it is tender, but still firm so it holds shape. Turn off the heat and set aside in the pan. 
 
To Prepare the Tofu & Veggies:
 
Cut the tofu block in half. Place each half in a clean paper towel one at a time and squeeze gently to remove excess storage liquid
 
Cut the tofu into 1/2-Inch cubes and pan fry on medium-high heat with 2 Tbsp cooking oil (in a separate non-stick frying pan).
 
Turn the tofu frequently until all the water is burned off and the tofu is lightly golden brown on most sides (be sure not to burn the tofu), combine with eggplant.
 
In the non-stick frying pan used for the tofu, add 1 tbsp cooking oil and heat on medium-high. Add the thinly sliced onions and bell peppers. Saute until they are cooked but still crispy. Add the minced garlic half way through. When done cooking add it to the eggplant and tofu.
 
To Prepare the Dish:
 
Whisk all ingredients listed under sauce above. Mix until all the cornstarch has dissolved. Add more chili sauce if you prefer additional spice.
 
Heat the pan containing eggplant, tofu, and veggies once more. 
 
Once the pan is hot, add the sauce, turn down the heat to low-medium and mix frequently until the sauce slightly thickens and coats the eggplant and veggies. This should only take a few minutes.
 
Turn off the heat and add some freshly chopped Thai basil. Mix once more and serve hot with some cooked quinoa or brown rice!

Fiesta Gitana

ORIGIN // Native to Europe, calendula is a plant already known and used in Antiquity by the Arabs, Greeks and Indians for its medicinal properties.

QUALITIES // Fiesta Gitana calendula is a dwarf type of calendula, it will grow 12-14″ tall. The double flowers range from deep orange to pastel cream, and are appreciated for their ornamental qualities.

USE // Calendula has many cosmetics and medicinal uses. Like Arnica or St. John’s Wort, it’s a must-have in your first-aid kit! It can be used in the preparation of dyes and colorants and its petals are edible: sprinkle over salads or add in your drinks for a fun touch and tangy sweet taste.




Care and Harvest

Pinch off the tops of the young plants to encourage bushy growth. 

Remove dead flower heads to encourage blooming.

For fresh flowers, cut the long stems and put them in water immediately. 

For culinary use, cut the head of the flowers and spread them out to dry completely. The dried petals can be used to replace saffron, or as a garnish. 

Days to Sprout

6 – 21 days

Matures In

50 - 55 days

Lavender

ORIGIN // Originally from the Mediterranean region, lavender was already used by the Romans to preserve linen and perfume baths. In Provence, lavender was used in the Middle Ages for the preparation of perfumes and medicines.

QUALITIES //  In phytotherapy, lavender is recommended to combat anxiety, and insomnia, thanks to its calming properties. Dried lavender flowers keep their fragrance for a very long time.




USE // Lavender can be used to perfume the house, dried and put in sachets in the rooms. It can be drank as herbal tea or even used for cooking: flowers are infused in milk, and then used to make lavender ice cream or lavender cream. A bouquet of lavender will be perfect for someone who seeks relaxation, with its wonderful scent and beautiful purple hue. 

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

15 – 30 days

Matures In

100 - 110 days

To promote stockier growth when young, cut the plant back by one-third once it has reached about 6 to 8 inches in height. The flowers may bloom a bit later, but there will be more of them. 

If you are using lavender to make essential oil, trim lavender when the flowers open. The oils are strongest when the flowers are young. 

When pruning your lavender, use a very clean hand pruner or shears to avoid bacterial disease. Avoid the use of craft scissors as they don’t make a clean cut.

Torenia

ORIGIN // Torenia are small herbaceous plants with opposite, toothed leaves, originating from tropical to temperate zones, mainly from the Americas. Its name was given in reference to the Swedish naturalist Olof Torén (1718-1753). Torenia is also commonly called the “wishbone flower”: the stamens of the blossom form a shape like a chicken wishbone.

QUALITIES // Torenia, with bicolor flowers, is appreciated for its ornamental qualities. Packed with colorful and tropical-looking flowers, in tones of burgundy, deep blue, yellow, magenta, rose and white, it will grow 8″ tall and will give an exotic touch to your Gardyn. Torenia is lightly fragrant.

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

6 – 20 days

Matures In

84 - 98 days

Pinch the young plants when they are about three inches tall to encourage branched growth and bushy shape. 

As plants fade out of bloom, cut off the flower stem below the flowers that are dying off and just above the first set of full, healthy leaves. Do this with all the dead flowers on the plant.




Campanula

ORIGIN // Campanula originated from Europe and is also commonly named Bellflower. Both its common and scientific latin names refer to the shape of its flowers, similar to small bells. Campanula is a symbol of unwavering love and gratitude.



QUALITIES // Campanula has a distinct look, with 30-36’’ tall stems and deep blue bell-shaped blooms that adorn them.  The deep-blue tone of the bells will brighten up the Gardyn. It has a soft, sweet scent and sturdy petals, that holds up well in bouquets.



Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

12 – 30 days

Matures In

60 - 70 days

Remove the faded or dead flowers from the plant to encourage re-blooming and improve its development. 

When flowers shed their petals, they begin to form seed heads, focusing the energy into the development of the seeds instead of the flowers. Cutting dead flowers can potentiate the flowering of the plant.

Petunia

ORIGIN // Petunia is a herbaceous plants of the family Solanaceae, native to the tropical regions of South America where it was discovered in the late 1700’s. The Shock Wave variety was first developed by Kirin Brewing Company in Japan in 1995.



QUALITIES // The Petunia Shock Wave will grow 7-10″ tall and produce an abundance of delicate trumpet-shaped pink flowers. The plant spreads and the flowers proliferate, covering the foliage, for an amazing pop of color. Petunia has a lovely fragrance.



Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

7 – 12 days

Matures In

30 - 40 days

Prune a few stems when you remove the wilted flowers as they bloom. These cuts will encourage the development of new branches, which will bring new flowers. The cut should be made at one-third to one-half the height of the stem.

If your petunias get more overgrown than you prefer, you can cut them back.




Radio Calendula

ORIGIN // Native to Europe, calendula is a plant already known and used in Antiquity by the Arabs, Greeks and Indians for its medicinal properties. The Radio type was introduced in the 1930s.

QUALITIES // With flowers looking like bright little suns, Radio Calendula is appreciated for its ornamental qualities. It will grow 18-24″ tall. Calendula has anti-inflammatory,  antiseptic and antibacterial properties.

 

USE // Calendula has many cosmetics and medicinal uses. Like Arnica or St. John’s Wort, it’s a must-have in your first-aid kit! It can be used in the preparation of dyes and colorants. Calendula petals are edible: sprinkle over salads or add in your drinks for a fun touch and tangy sweet taste.



Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

6 – 14 days

Matures In

50 - 55 days

Pinch off the tops of the young plants to encourage bushy growth. 

Remove dead flower heads to encourage blooming.

For fresh flowers, cut the long stems and put them in water immediately. 

For culinary use, cut the head of the flowers and spread them out to dry completely. The dried petals can be used to replace saffron, or as a garnish. 

Italian Parsley

ORIGIN // Parsley was cultivated since ancient times by Greeks and Romans, but was traditionally used as a medicinal herb and not used in culinary dishes until later.

QUALITIES // an herb with bright and flat leaves, Parsley contains the flavonoids and terpenes limonene and myristicin, in addition to being high in phosphorus and calcium. It also has been shown to have anti-hyperlipidemia qualities.

USE // Italian parsley is usually dried and incorporated into Italian herb blends alongside rosemary, thyme, and oregano. It can be also be used fresh, typically added late to a dish as a final seasoning, garnish, or topping.

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

10 – 30 days

Matures In

70-90 days

Taste it For

30 - 50 days

Parsley is related to cilantro and grows similarly. Harvest parsley leaves as soon as the plant is producing enough to leave some behind and continue growth. Harvest until the plant flowers, after which time the leaves become bitter. Remove stalks and strip leaves as needed- the plant will continue to grow as its “grazed” on. Leave behind a section of the stalk with leaves for it to continue growing, or harvest the whole stalk and hang for 7-14 days until dry, if incorporating the parsley into an herbal blend. 

Shiso

ORIGIN // Shiso is an Asian culinary herb that has been a long standing staple of Chinese herbal medicine. While technically a member of the mint family, Shiso has incredibly broad leaves and a complex flavor that combines savory cumin and nutmeg with lighter herbal notes of mint and anise.

QUALITIES // Shiso is broad-leafed, and grows in a structure and style very similar to basil. Shiso does well in warmer climates and can be a fun summer visitor to your Gardyn! Well adapted to full sun or partial shade, place your Shiso near the perimeter of the Gardyn’s center where it can get moderate to high amounts of light.

USE // Shiso leaves are best used raw and fresh from your Gardyn, and can be substituted for basil or mint in most recipes that call for them. The flavor is complex and has been described as savory, citrusy, and herbaceous.

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

7 – 14 days

Matures In

50 - 60 days*

Taste it For

8+ weeks*

The leaves can be harvested individually, but it’s a good idea to “top” the plant by pruning its main growth tip. This will cause your Shiso to bush up and quickly provide more leafsites for harvesting. *While Shiso fully matured in eight weeks, the leaves can be harvested when the plant is still young and growing. Just remember to harvest light and keep some leaves behind! Remove flower heads as they form to prevent seeding and encourage more leaf production. 

Sorrel

ORIGIN // A popular feature in French cuisine, Sorrel has been used in ancient Europe and Egypt to impart an intense lemon-citrus flavor in dishes.

QUALITIES // Romans and Greeks historically used sorrel to help digestion after heavy meals. Medicinally it has been used to aid skin conditions, liver conditions, and fever. Sorrel has significant amounts of Vitamin C, potassium, phosphorus, calcium and magnesium. 

USE //Use as desired to taste: Sorrel boasts intense flavor! Sorrel traditionally pairs excellently with whitefish, can be used to boost flavor in soups, or is added to salads for bursts of flavor. The flavor is often described as an acidic, refreshing, spinach-like astringency.

Care and Harvest

Days to Sprout

7 – 14 days

Matures In

50 - 60 days*

Taste it For

4 - 5 weeks

The leaves can be harvested individually when they are about 4-5 inches long. Leaves have the best flavor and tenderness when they are young. Remove flower buds as they appear to encourage the plant to continue producing leaves! Use sorrel leaves fresh: they can be stored in the refrigerator for 1-2 weeks if necessary. They can also be frozen or dried for longer term storage, but will lose much of their flavor.  

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