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CHAMOMILE

DAYS TO SPROUT

DAYS TO
SPROUT

10-14 DAYS

MATURES IN

MATURES
IN

75-120 DAYS

TASTE IT FOR

TASTE IT
FOR

6-10 WEEKS

CARE & HARVEST

Harvest blossoms when they’ve fully bloomed. Only the blossoms are used for teas. The plant will continue producing blooms to be continually harvested; simply pluck flowers at their peak bloom to make way for more.

Dry the collected blooms in a temperate, well ventilated space for up to two weeks, until buds are dry. They are now ready for long term storage in an air-tight container, and can be added to teas or dishes. Blooms can be used fresh as well for immediate use.

QUICK FACTS

Chamomile has been used for millennia as a staple in herbal medicine. The name “chamomile” is derived from Greek by way of French, and means “ground apple”. The fragrant, healing blossoms are relatives of the daisy. Hippocrates, the father of medicine, had used chamomile in the 500’s BCE.

Chamomile has long been brewed into teas, extracted into tinctures, and included in gourmet dishes. It’s typically used as a calming, anti-anxiety agent and can help defeat bouts of insomnia.

HARVEST TO PLATE RECIPE

fresh ginger chamomile tea

Photo / Recipe Source: Sugar Salted

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 cups (700ml) boiling water
  • one 1-inch (2-3 cm) piece of ginger root, peeled and grated
  • 2 TBSPs dried chamomile flowers 
  • juice from 1/2 small lemon
  • 1 TBSP honey, more to taste

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Pour boiling water in a heat-proof jar (or fill up a kettle that has a sieve). Add ginger and chamomile. Steep for 10-15 minutes.
  2. Stir in lemon juice and honey. Strain the tea, pour into a mug and enjoy. Add more honey if needed. Keep leftover tea in the refrigerator for up to 1-2 days. Warm up on the stove before drinking again or enjoy cold. 
 
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