AS LOW AS $39/mo with Affirm

MEXICAN TARRAGON

DAYS TO SPROUT

DAYS TO
SPROUT

4-14 DAYS

MATURES IN

MATURES
IN

75-85 DAYS

TASTE IT FOR

TASTE IT
FOR

8-20 WEEKS

CARE & HARVEST

Mexican Tarragon can grow indefinitely in your Gardyn, but it might be time to grow a new seed if your plant is looking stressed after a few harvests.
 
Wait until your plant is at least 8” long before harvesting. Harvest by cutting the top 4-6” off the branches. It’s important to leave enough branch remaining for the plant to continue growing. Optionally, wait until the branch blooms before harvesting to collect edible flowers and leaves.
 
Pluck or cut leaves and flowers off harvested branches to use fresh.
 
To dry for long-term storage, tie the fresh branches together and hang-dry until the branches snap instead of bend before stripping off the leaves and flowers.

QUICK FACTS

Also known as Winter Tarragon, this cousin of the marigold is native to Mexico and Central America. The toothed, thin leaves share the flavor of traditional tarragon with a pleasant anise scent, and the flowers are edible too. Winter Tarragon is said to have been used as a ritual incense by the Aztecs and as a key ingredient in a medicinal tea used by the Huichol.

Can help calm nausea. Antifungal / antibacterial properties. Improves dreaming. Produces the terpenes cineol, estragole, ocimene, and phellandrene.

Dried Mexican Tarragon leaves and flowers are edible and commonly used as a seasoning. It can be a direct substitute for French Tarragon. Flavor pairs especially well with lemon, pear, or black pepper. Can also be used as an herbal tea.

ORIGIN // Also known as Winter Tarragon, this cousin of the marigold is native to Mexico and Central America. The toothed, thin leaves share the flavor of traditional tarragon with a pleasant anise scent, and the flowers are edible too. Winter Tarragon is said to have been used as a ritual incense by the Aztecs and as a key ingredient in a medicinal tea used by the Huichol.

QUALITIES // Can help calm nausea. Antifungal / antibacterial properties. Improves dreaming. Produces the terpenes cineol, estragole, ocimene, and phellandrene.

USE // Dried Mexican Tarragon leaves and flowers are edible and commonly used as a seasoning. It can be a direct substitute for French Tarragon. Flavor pairs especially well with lemon, pear, or black pepper. Can also be used as an herbal tea.

HARVEST TO PLATE RECIPE

Potato, Swiss Chard & Tarragon Salad

Photo / Recipe Source: Edible Houston

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 pound yellow potatoes, peeled and diced
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh tarragon (or Mexican marigold)
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • juice of 1 lime
  • zest of ½ lemon
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 bunch rainbow chard, washed
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • salt and pepper to taste

INSTRUCTIONS

Cook diced potatoes in salted water. When soft but still firm, use a slotted spoon to transfer immediately to ice-cold water. Drain well and transfer to a bowl.

Mix together chopped tarragon, lemon juice, zest, lime juice, mustard and olive oil. Let infuse. Strip the leaves off the chard stems. Dice the stems, chop the leaves fine.

Heat the vegetable oil in a skillet and add the stems. Stir-fry briefly, then add the leaves to wilt. Season with salt and pepper. Transfer to a plate and let cool completely. Chop the chard mixture smaller with a kitchen knife (fine enough to mix well with the potatoes). Mix together potatoes and tarragon dressing. Spoon through chard and finish to taste.